Archive for the ‘For The Dogs’ Category

What an AAHA Accreditation Means For Your Pet

Friday, January 6th, 2023
Veterinarian Dr. Anthony DiAngelis with puppy patient

When it comes to finding the right veterinary hospital, many pet owners depend on recommendations from friends or relatives. And while this can lead to great results, less than a quarter of all animal hospitals in the U.S. and Canada voluntarily agree to the highest standards of care established by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). This means that a vast majority of clinics and hospitals do not follow strict protocols and procedures designed to achieve the best possible health outcomes. We are proud of our AAHA accreditation for many reasons, and the confidence it provides pet owners ranks pretty high. 

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CBD for Dogs: Safe or Hard Pass?

Tuesday, December 6th, 2022
Beagle dog licking young man's face.

When it comes to pain management for dogs, Berkeley Veterinary Center is all ears. Anything that could possibly help (wo)man’s best friend be a little more comfortable can’t be bad, right? When it comes to CBD for dogs, it can be hard to know if it is a valid treatment option or a waste of money. Keep reading to learn about whether CBD is safe for pain management for dogs or if you should keep looking. 

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Fear Free Certified: What Does it Mean for You and Your Pet?

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2022
A calm cat relaxes on its owner's shoulder.

If you know the team at Berkeley Veterinary Center, you probably already know how dedicated we are to bringing the best in veterinary medicine to you and your family. Besides being AAHA accredited, did you know that our practice is also Fear Free Certified? While that may sound impressive, you might be asking yourself “what does Fear Free Certified mean?” Well, look no further for an explanation as to why it’s important and what it means to you and your four-legged friends.

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A Day in the Life of a Service Dog

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2022
A white service dog.

All dogs are special in the eyes of their human companions, and it’s no wonder. Dogs offer a constant source of companionship and unconditional love. But for people who depend on a dog to serve, assist, and protect their quality of life and independence, the human-animal bond reaches even deeper levels of trust and significance.  

At Berkeley Veterinary Center, we honor and celebrate service dogs and the pivotal roles they play in the lives of those who rely on their support. If you or someone in your care could benefit from having a service dog, keep reading for information about how to make your dog a service dog or how to get a service dog of your own. 

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Dangers of Heartworm Disease

Tuesday, April 5th, 2022
A woman hugs a sad dog.

Heartworm disease is a serious condition that can occur in both dogs and cats. The parasitic worms (called Dirofilaria immitis) are spread through mosquito bites and take up residence inside an animal’s heart, lungs, and blood vessels. 

While potentially deadly, heartworm disease is preventable. Our pet experts at Berkeley Veterinary Center take parasite control very seriously, and it is something we will discuss with you at every wellness visit

To understand the dangers of a parasitic infection like heartworms, read on. 

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Pupercise: How Much Exercise Do Dogs Need?

Wednesday, September 8th, 2021
Owner walking dog for exercise.

Dogs are active creatures that need a certain amount of physical activity to stay healthy, mentally stimulated, and happy. With so many different breeds of so many different shapes and sizes, it can be difficult to determine how much exercise your dog might need. Your friends at Berkeley Veterinary Center want to help you figure out how much you need to keep your favorite canine moving to ensure he or she stays in the best shape.

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How To Tell If Your Pet Has Allergies

Friday, May 7th, 2021
Dog with allergies scratching his ear.

Although our furry friends cannot verbalize their discomfort with words, they do offer plenty of physical signals when something is amiss. Dog and cat allergies are just as common for our four-legged friends as human allergies are for us. Although they can be caused by a wide-range of allergens (including food, plants, pollen, dust mites, and even flea saliva), allergies in pets tend to present with similar symptoms. If you notice any of the following, it’s time to schedule an appointment at Berkeley Veterinary Center to see if allergies are the cause.

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The Joys (and Sometimes Challenges) of New Dog Ownership

Friday, October 23rd, 2020
A cute happy puppy greets his new dog owner.

If you have decided to adopt or bring a new pet companion into your life, congratulations! Pets are wonderful companions and are so hard to resist when we see them looking lonely in a shelter or rescue. No wonder there are so many multi-pet households, since one sweetie is never enough! 

If you have never cared for a pet before, there is a lot to consider when it comes to making the adoption and your life with a new pet successful. The team at Berkeley Veterinary Center is here to give you some helpful tips as you embark on new dog ownership.

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Are Pet Vaccines Necessary for Pet Health?

Thursday, August 20th, 2020
A tabby cat sitting on a chair

Like humans, pets are susceptible to a multitude of dangerous contagious viruses and bacteria. Prior to the advent of vaccines, many pets suffered from these illnesses and often suffered an early death. Thankfully, veterinary science has developed safe and effective vaccines for many diseases, and these have saved countless animals from needless suffering. 

While vaccinations have safeguarded countless pets from disease, some pet owners are still skeptical. Are vaccinations necessary for your pet’s health? The team of veterinary experts at Berkeley Veterinary Center is here to explain this important topic.

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Your Pet’s Fear Free Experience

Wednesday, March 20th, 2019
A dog being checked by vet staff

At Berkeley Veterinary Center, a Fear Free experience for you and your furry friends is of utmost priority to us. Did you know that our staff and doctors have undergone special training to ensure that your pet’s stress, anxiety, and fear is kept as minimal as possible during their visit?

Learn about all the extra things we do at our Fear Free Certified facility to make your pet’s experience a great one!

It’s the Little Things

There are so many things that go into helping each pet who enters our practice feel at ease. Fear Free is about adapting to the needs of each individual patient. For example, a food-loving lab is going to require a much different approach than a terrified kitty!

Some of the things that we do to decrease fear, anxiety, and stress in our patients may include:

A kitten being held while being treated

Treats, treats, and more treats — We utilize food as a reward and a distraction for many of our patients. This helps us to earn their trust and is often enough to keep a pet preoccupied during their exam. Special high value treats like spray cheese and peanut butter are always on hand, but you are encouraged to bring along your pet’s favorites. Be sure your pets arrive to their appointment hungry!

Pheromones everywhere — While you may not notice them, your dog or cat is sure to take note of the pheromone diffusers throughout our hospital. Feliway for cats and Adaptil for dogs help to put our patients at ease.

Getting down — Getting down on your pet’s level helps to create a sense of calm in many of our patients. Don’t be surprised to see us down on the floor. We may also get creative about performing procedures where your pet is most comfortable, such as in someone’s arms or up on one of our chairs. It’s all about getting things done safely and without anxiety.

A smelly undertaking — We hope that you notice the absence of smells in our hospital when you walk in. Your pet is sure to notice as well. We take extra care to remove odors that may cause nose-blindness or feed fear in the animals who visit.

No dogs allowed — Almost nothing is scarier for our feline patients than being greeted face-to-face by an unfamiliar and most unwelcome dog. The barking, smells, and general commotion that comes with canines can increase stress and anxiety in our cat patients.  Separate dog and cat entrances into the hospital, separate dog and cat waiting rooms, and a cat-only exam room help to minimize this.

A considerate approach — You may wonder why we don’t just jump in and get the job done. Moving slowly and using a pet’s body language to gauge how they are feeling can help us to get more accomplished during your pet’s visit with less stress and anxiety.  

Calming sounds — Sometimes the sounds at a veterinary hospital can be disconcerting for already anxious animals. We do our best to minimize these, often using calming music to help.

Prioritizing wants vs needs — We may have a laundry list of things that we hope to accomplish during your pet’s visit, but your pet will likely have some different ideas. We do our best to prioritize the things that “need” to happen, saving the things that we “want” to happen for last. This allows us to provide the best medicine for your pet, while making good judgements about when to push on and when to maybe try under different circumstances another day.

Our Waiting room

Fear Free is Our Goal

A Fear Free experience is very important to us. It is a rewarding feeling to work with your pets in a stress-free environment. Creating this experience for our pet patients is rewarding because it helps to build a sense of trust in the dogs and cats we treat and makes them want to see us again. It also allows us to see their true personalities, and to get to know them better.

If you have questions or want to learn more about Fear Free, please give us a call. We would love to meet you and your pet. You can also find more information on Fear Free at FearFreePets.com.